14th Annual Holocaust Education Week: November 1 – 8, 2017

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2017 Holocaust Education Week Schedule:

Wednesday, November 1 – Opening Program

The Power of Memoir and Storytelling: What Can We Learn from the Trauma of the Past?

Halifax Central Library, Paul O’Regan Hall
5440 Spring Garden Road, Halifax | 7:00 pm
Introduced and facilitated by Dr. Dorota Glowacka, University of King’s College

Olga Milosevich, retired CBC Radio broadcaster, reads from Chief Lightning Bolt, the first novel by Mi’kmaw Elder, Dr. Daniel N. Paul, the author of We Were Not the Savages. In this tale of peace and war, friendship and love, Paul brings back to life the customs, traditions, and rich spirituality of pre-contact Mi’kma’ki.

Nate Leipciger, who, as a young teenager, survived several Nazi concentration camps and a death march, joins Theodore Fontaine, former chief of the Sagkeeng Ojibway First Nation and survivor of the Fort Alexander and Assiniboia Indian Residential Schools, in a conversation about how they came to write their memoirs. Their two distinct narratives intersect and speak to each other in examining loss, trauma and the use of memoir in the journey toward healing.


Sunday, November 5

KAMP: The Musical

Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21, Rowe Hall
1055 Marginal Road, Halifax | 2:00 pm

KAMP: The Musical is an original Nova Scotia musical by local Halifax artists Jamie Bradley (Book) and Garry Williams (Music, Lyrics). KAMP tells the story of a group of homosexual men who, convicted under Paragraph 175, are forced to wear the pink triangle against the backdrop of isolation Block 14 in a Nazi concentration camp. These men suffer heavy labour and torture; yet, find the strength to defy their captors by producing a secret cabaret, replete with political satire, drag, and plenty of “camp”. Using their wit, talent, art, and irreverence, they struggle to survive, hold on to their identities, and save their humanity. KAMP: The Musical was inspired by historical truth.

Kamp: The Musical was developed with the support of Playwright’s Atlantic Resource Centre, Arts Nova Scotia, and DaPoPo Theatre.

The Atlantic Jewish Council recognizes the support of the Province of Nova Scotia. We are pleased to work in partnership with the Department of Communities, Culture and Heritage to develop and promote our cultural resources for all Nova Scotians.


Wednesday, November 8 – Feature Film

Fanny’s Journey

Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21, Bronfman Theatre
1055 Marginal Road, Halifax | 7:00 pm

Special guest: Dr. Erin Corber
Inaugural Simon and Riva Spatz Visiting Chair of Jewish Studies | Department of History | Dalhousie University

France/Belgium, 2016 | French with English subtitles
Running Time: 94 mins

A Film by Lola Doillon Based on the True Story of Fanny Ben-Ami, starring Cécile de France (Hereafter, The Young Pope).

Fanny’s Journey is an incredible tale of bravery, strength and survival, a story of a daring young girl who will stop at nothing and fear no one. In 1943, 13-year old Fanny and her younger sisters were sent from their home in France to an Italian foster home for Jewish children. When the Nazis arrive in Italy, their caretakers desperately organize the departure of the children to Switzerland. When they are suddenly left on their own, these 11 children do the impossible and reach the Swiss border to freedom.

“A handsome, compelling period piece, serving up a tour-de-force performance by Cécile de France.” VARIETY

“The perfect feel good movie.” ELLE MAGAZINE


Program for Junior and High School Students:

Thursday, November 2 – High School Student Program

Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21
1055 Marginal Road, Halifax | 10:00 am

Holocaust survivor Nate Leipciger and former chief of the Sagkeeng Ojibway First Nation and Residential School survivor Theodore Fontaine discuss loss, trauma, and memoir in the journey toward healing.

See November 1 program information. Advanced registration required:
Rebecca McKenzie-Hopkins, Public Programs Manager: rmackenzie-hopkins@pier21.ca
Edna LeVine, Director of Community Engagement: elevine@theajc.ns.ca


Tuesday, November 7 – Junior High School Student Program

Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21
1055 Marginal Road, Halifax | 10:00 am

Margaret and Arthur’s Story chronicles the Weiszes’ experiences during WWII, their escape from Hungary to Canada and their new life in Hamilton. Told through the eyes of living Weisz descendants, this 35 minute documentary addresses the themes of courage, survival and love, and educates youth about the need for tolerance and kindness in our world.

In attendance Danna and her father, Tom Weisz, who will further illuminate the story of his parents’ journey and answer questions.

The large group presentation will be followed by small group presentations available on-site at Pier 21 or in classrooms (HRM only).

Contact Rebecca MacKenzie-Hopkins at publicprograms@pier21.ca for more information.

This program is made possible by Margaret’s Legacy, which is funded by the Weisz Family Foundation.


The 14th annual Holocaust Education Week programs are made possible in part by a generous grant from The Azrieli Foundation.

2017 Sponsors and Partners:

The Azrieli Foundation

The Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21

The Centre for Israel and Jewish Affairs

The Halifax Central Public Library

The University of King’s College

Nova Scotia Department of Communities, Culture and Heritage

2 Responses to “14th Annual Holocaust Education Week: November 1 – 8, 2017”

  1. Irma van der leeuw
    November 5, 2017 at 6:55 pm #

    Iam just watching CTV News Atlantic about the hollocaust and what we have to watch for the signs that can lead to the same as in the second world war but is it not that the world has stood by and stand by ? Take Syria Russia and other countries were so much suffering is going on right now if we talk about hollocaust we don’t have to look far it’s right here on our own door step

  2. Andrea D'Sylva
    November 6, 2017 at 8:41 am #

    To all those involved with bringing Kamp to the week’s event, many thanks. To the Chair of the Holocaust Education Week (whose name I cannot recall) who spoke so warmly and with such passion about the reason for events such as this, to Jamie Bradley and Garry Williams for their work on the production and to all the performers.

    It was a piece of history not well known and the telling was both humourous and very moving.

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